Why do Blacks view Naturism as ‘so white’.

This blog post is in response to this post here: Why is nudism portrayed as being so White?

So as you can see in these pictures there are almost no black people in these pictures.  Why is that?  It is not because of racism on the part of whites, but on the part of Blacks.  Black America, for years, in an attempt to create their own culture, have designated every thing from clothes, to music, to even certain activities as for Blacks, or for Whites.  I can remember this going on ever since i was a child.  Country and rock music were designated as ‘for white people’, while Rap, Soul, and R&B were designated as ‘for black people’.  The stupidity doesn’t end there.  Riding bikes through the park: white people.  Bird watching: white people.  Skiing: most definitely for white people.  And finally Marlboro cigarettes: for white people.

To do any of the aforementioned activities deemed you as ‘less black’, a Uncle Tom, or a Carlton Banks.  As a black person you could be shunned by your fellow blacks for doing any of those activities.  And so we shied away from them and being raised in a environment where activities, clothing, and even smoking cigarettes were divided by race a black person has a subconscious and conscious tendency to continue the idea.  When most blacks seen anything involving Naturism or Nudism we mostly see whites doing it.  So immediately our conscious and subconscious say, “This is something white people do, so I cannot or will not do so.”  After this a racist factor may also be imposed on the activity.  Years of older generations of blacks warning us of white being angry or fearful of us being in the midst of them and stealing their males or females has been drilled in our heads.  So with certain white activities that we shun we use a belief of unfounded racism as a reason not to get involved.

There is very little Naturism can do about this, even showing more pictures of black naturists in magazines and online won’t help.  Those blacks in such pictures will be seen as a rare thing, as Uncle Toms or poor naive ignorant blacks who don’t realize that the whites are so uncomfortable with a black person involving themselves in their precious activity.  So blacks then justify non-involvement by saying they do not wish to make whites feel uncomfortable around them.  In other words a vicious cycle ensues where blacks stifle themselves from enjoying life to the fullest.  And whites wonder if they have done something wrong and acquire ‘white guilt’ about their activities where none is needed.

In the end i think White nudists have done all they can to welcome and encourage the Black community with open arms into Nudism.  Its Black America that has the hang up about the naked body, and the fault of Black racism when it comes to joining the Nudist community.  Blacks must set aside their fear, arrogance, and assumptive racism in order to become a part of the Nudist community.  I hope this post clears up any preconceived notions about Blacks and Naturism.

21 thoughts on “Why do Blacks view Naturism as ‘so white’.

  1. Pingback: Why do Blacks view Naturism as ‘so white’. | Nomad, Geek, Nudie

  2. Steven

    I took an ebony woman to a nudist resort this past summer and she enjoyed it and she was the only black person there. No one treated her differently and she told me she enjoyed the experience. Why blacks do not go to the resorts is they are not offered the opportunity to do so. By going on their own they can break that barrier that is not really there. I would have loved to have seen an ebony couple there and they would have been more than welcomed by everyone.

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    1. clothesfreelife

      I have been working on piece about the role race and racial history places in the presence of black folks in the naturist/clothes free community. Been trying to get the perspective of black folks currently living clothes free or exploring the practice. Email me if you have perspective you think should be included.

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  3. The Black Male Nudist

    I’ve asked the same thing. I just don’t understand why the Black Community deems it as a “White Only Thing” it is for eveveryone. I havr taken my friends to nudist events and they enjoyed it and educated themselves on it

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  4. nudewoody

    Sorry, but racism does not work that way. Racism is structural and institutional in that it delineates a group of people based on some physical characteristics (skin color, hair texture, etc.) and uses those characteristics to oppress that group in every aspect of their social life. Blacks cannot, by definition, be racist towards whites. For blacks to be racist, they would need to have all of the power that white people now possess in order to restrict access to jobs, education, justice, wealth, etc. to whites. Obviously, blacks do not.

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    1. William Post author

      Sorry woody but i don’t buy that. Racism is more then just what you discussed. If you believe that all whites are by default; shady, crooked lazy, underhanded, and less then human then that is racism. Racism is just as much thought as it is institution. So yes when you call a white person a racial slur you are being racist. Take a look at other nations. The Japanese are very racist in mindset and institution to virtually anyone non-Japanese.

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      1. nudewoody

        Well, I don’t buy your argument either. Apparently we disagree about the definition of racism. You can believe that all whites are by default; shady, crooked lazy, underhanded, and less then human , but that still doesn’t mean that whites as a group are held back in education, paid less money and have less chances of advancement in careers, get stopped and shot by cops routinely, have a history of being kidnapped, raped, murdered nad sold into slavery to build the infrastructure of an entire nation. In my opinion, you are conflating bigotry with racism. They are two differant things.

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  5. Antandrian

    I noticed the same effect in the UK, in which outdoorsy activities were White, even just going to the beach, at least up till the 1990s. Non-European immigrants stayed in the urban areas they lived in, the whole time. You saw them a lot at international airports, flying between countries, but virtually never in the rural areas of the country they actually lived in. It may have changed now there are second and third generation people of Jamaican and subcontinental heritage there.

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  6. hontouniheart

    Maybe it’s not about race / racism at all. Skin color and other physical features are easy visual factors to go to, so I can see how a lot of people might put the conversation in that context, but, at least speaking for myself (I can’t speak for others), I never saw it as a “race issue” or a “race problem.” I am a young black woman in the US. I came into clothes free life in August 2014 by way of a naked yoga challenge on Instagram. Another black woman I followed tagged me to join her in trying out the challenge. One of the co-hosts of that round of the challenge was a black man who leads a clothes free life. So, it was by following him during the naked yoga challenge that I learned about clothes free life / naturism. Prior to that, though, I had never heard of it in my life.

    Naturism / clothes free life was one of many things about which I had never heard in my life. I grew up in a very uncertain and unstable family environment where we kept losing our homes and everything we owned. We struggled financially, and my small world of the city in which I lived was all I knew. I had never heard of gouda cheese, I had never seen real bread (only the weird stuff sold at the market, I had never had real fresh yogurt, and I didn’t know what “organic” or “natural” was. I thought real ramen was that $0.10 Maruchan brand pack stuff from Aldi (low budget grocery store in the city in which I grew up). I had never heard of lacrosse, rugby, udon, tempura, blues dancing, tamales, or the country Kyrgyzstan… and the list goes on. And it was all because I just lived where I lived, and my family was so busy struggling to make ends meet that we simply didn’t explore a lot of other things out in the world.

    And as far as clubs and so forth go, I don’t think race is a sufficient place to focus on for that either, at least not on its own. I have seen plenty of people talk about how going to clubs and resorts is challenging for them because of the time and cost to get there, gender balance rules, wanting to go with someone rather than go alone, not wanting to be tagged as belonging to a club / membership (memberships generally are not necessarily the most popular thing for younger crowds), wanting to have active endeavors, and so forth.

    My point is that tossing the conversation into the context of “race” leaves out a whole other set of factors that go from broad all the way down to the individual. Might there be racists? Sure. I dunno, but if so, it’s not because of naturism, it’s because these people pop up everywhere in the world, everywhere in life. There are racists who do yoga. And we all have biases, whether or not we see them, whether or not we work through them. So, focusing so hard on race, and race alone, I don’t know how helpful that is to get a sense of all the nuances that influence how people choose to engage with anything in life, really.

    I’m actually writing some reflections right now about some related thoughts, not regarding race, but why clothes free life should matter when people have so many other pressures to deal with: being single parents having to work 3 jobs to make ends meet, jobless, homeless, and so forth. From my own experience in this last 1.5 years, I have a lot of personal healing and growth experiences that motivate me to continue writing about and sharing my clothes free life with others, and that inspires me to want to teach naked yoga and to show how clothes free yoga / clothes free life / naturism could help people heal from traumas and so forth. A friend and I were just talking about this a few days ago as he popped a similar question. For some, there can be many factors that make them ask, “why does this need to be important?” Why does naturism / clothes free life matter, when they don’t have the right to marry? Why make naturism a big deal when they can’t make ends meet? Or if they are worried about being deported every single day? And those questions can come up for anyone, regardless of the color of their skin, their background, class, whatever.

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    1. William Post author

      Thank you so much for your timely comment hontouniheart. As usual its a lady that gives a different and much more logical answer in this debate. I did not know you had a website until now. Please reblog this and comment or write you own post about this issue. I do value you input on this as a naturist who has been to a resort and as a person who seems to have more knowledge then me.

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    2. sassycoupleok

      Thank you and Amen my friend for stepping in and leaving you informed and inspiring comments here. For our lifestyle to prosper, grow and gain acceptance unity is required.

      Liked by 1 person

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  7. backpacker56

    Thanks for tackling a vexing problem whose solution is crucial for all of society and naturism in particular. The seeds of division are deep and multiple. No simple answer such as, it’s all due to racism or religion is adequate as both you and others have pointed out. As a group we are all flawed human beings and in general would like to overcome past failings and move toward a better future for everyone in every worthwhile arena of life that anyone wishes to participate in. I would appreciate being contacted to discuss re-printing your essay in our naturist club newsletter.

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